Why the Imperial War Museums’ Archive Award Matters


The hard-fought defence of the Imperial War Museum’s library and related facilities from planned cuts will prove meaningless if public accessibility is not maintained and developed by IWM. The Museum’s mission statement of telling the story of the causes and consequences of conflict cannot be met unless archives are not only preserved but promoted through library and research services that enable public access to both archival material and supporting non-archival collections.

The recent accreditation of the IWM archive by the UK Archive Service Accreditation Committee not only vindicates the efforts of staff and other campaigners but can be used to protect the archives from new threats, such as any plans for re-location of collections to IWM Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

The award of the Archive Service Accreditation makes IWM only the second national museum to be accredited, alongside the V&A, since the standard was introduced in 2013. It confirms IWM’s suitability as holder of certain public records. Not only does the archive award recognise good practice in archive services management but also serves to encourage and support improvement, including helping archive services “adapt and respond to user needs and interests, and develop their workforce.”

Recognition of IWM’s archive standards vindicates the efforts of staff and campaigners who fought tirelessly to save the reference library and related services from cuts during 2014/15. IWM’s library collection includes the War Memorials Archive, First World War Women’s Work Collection, War Office and Ministry of Information collections. These books and ephemera collections likely constitute archives under the Society of American Archivists definition. Moreover, the non-archival – or “non-core” library material shed light on the archival collections, thus their availability also plays an important role in public accessibility of the archival material.

Following major government cuts to the Museum’s grant, in 2014/15, IWM proposed to close its library, dispose of the majority of its 300,000 item collection, end important educational services, cut 60-80 jobs and close the educational/research Explore History facility at IWM London.

An astonishing figure of nearly 21,000 people signed an online petition to save the IWM library and other services, following a campaign lead by IWM library staff and the Prospect union. As a result of public pressure, the Government pledged £8 million over four years to safeguard the immediate future of educational facilities and IWM backed down from its most drastic moves, offering a reprieve to the library. Instead reduced services were imposed, including, a reduced Explore History service with closure on weekends, a reduced Research Room service, an end to the telephone collections enquiry and booking service and some job cuts to library staff. IWM finally backed down from its proposal to charge for access to the Research Room.

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Petition to save IWM Library and services (Prospect union)

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Prospect union members campaigning to save IWM Library (loveimperialwarmuseumlibrary.wordpress.com)

Following the IWM Library campaign victory, Prospect union negotiator, Andy Bye struck a note of caution: “The huge publicity as the election looms has contributed to this climb-down. However, the long-term future of the library’s collections is still not guaranteed – the status of 240,000 library items has been changed so they are no longer part of the core collection. The devil may be in the detail and our members will continue to be vigilant about protecting this national resource.”

Like all museums, IWM has auctioned off “un-accessioned” and “duplicate de-accessioned” items in its collections, including books and ephemera. In “exceptional cases” of “last resort” IWM is permitted to dispose items for principally financial reasons if criteria are met.

Reduced services, such as an end to the telephone collections enquiry service that received some 22,000 calls a year, has reduced the public’s access to IWM’s collections. The latest threat is possible re-location of parts of the collection to IWM Duxford in Cambridgeshire, 10 miles outside of Cambridge, where new a new £2.1 million archive storage complex is planned by IWM. These plans have been prompted by proposed new WW2 and Holocaust galleries as part of phase 2 of the IWM London regeneration project.

Even if only “non-core” items of the collection are re-located to IWM Duxford, the effect will be to reduce accessibility of core archival material, as non-core items play an important role in shedding light on archival material.

The latest project to develop new galleries could mask a major re-location of parts of IWM’s collections and staff, undermining public access – just as the fanfare, in 2014, of new £40 million WW1 galleries overshadowed drastic plans to end library and related services. If “non-core” library items are re-located, for example, the future of IWM London’s library staff must be questioned. This in turn raises questions about the future of the educational drop-in Explore History service and, even, the Research Room, which are both operated by senior library staff.

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Research Room, IWM London

To continue to meet the standards of its new accreditation, IWM must consider how re-location of any parts of its archive or complementary items from the collection will affect the public: “The archive service demonstrates a good understanding of the needs and interests of the community it is established to serve. It has plans in place which detail the actions that are being taken to meet stakeholders’ access requirements and to continuously improve service provision.” [Requirement 3.2, Access Plans and Planning Requirement].

Any drastic re-location of IWM’s archive or complementary items may undermine accreditation standards, notably the duty to document plans “to continuously improve access and engagement in response to the identified needs and interests of its community. The plans are actively implemented and reviewed.” [Requirement 3.2.3]

Job cuts or re-location threaten the requirement that the archive service has a workforce “appropriate in experience and numbers to carry out the service’s responsibilities and plans.” [Requirement 1.6, Resources: Workforce]

The acquisition, appraisal and deaccessioning of archive items must be “holistically connected and clearly linked to the organisation’s mission statement.” [Requirement 2.2, Collections Development].

The accreditation standards, particularly with regards continuous improvement of accessibility, are in direct conflict with archive service reduction prompted for any reason, be it requirements of new exhibition space or government funding cuts. How these conflicts are to be managed is not discussed in the accreditation guidelines, except that in three years’ time, IWM will have to show to the assessor “progress against required actions or improvement actions outlined in the feedback to their initial application.”

Campaigners and staff opposing changes to education and research services which disrupt public access and the Museum’s ability to fulfil its public mission can hold IWM decision-makers to its new archive accreditation.

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Book Review: Dadland by Keggie Carew

Two very different dramas are brought together in Dadland. One is the story of a daughter losing the charismatic and contrarian father she knew to dementia. The other is that of a young man parachuted behind the lines in Nazi-occupied France to organise the resistance and, having escaped the Germany army, sent to Burma to lead guerrilla attacks against the Japanese. The combination of family drama, war-time exploits of the SOE and Keggie Carew’s meticulous historical research makes this biography of her father a compelling read.

The figure at the heart of Dadland is the author’s father, Tom Carew, born in Dublin in 1919. The reader is introduced to Tom as an elderly man losing his identity through dementia and his daughter’s efforts to hang on to him. The death of his domineering third wife had renewed the relationship between father and daughter – only for Tom to start to lose his memory. Tom struggles to recognise his family, let alone his past as an agent of the Special Executive Operative (SOE) deployed during WW2 in Operation Jedburgh and, later, in Burma.

Keggie Carew was moved by her father’s dementia to tell the story of his dramatic experiences as a young man during WW2. At 24-years-old, Tom Carew was parachuted into France in an operation involving co-operation between the British, US, French and Belgians to undertake the perilous task of working with the resistance in espionage, sabotage and reconnaissance operations. He would later escape from the Germany army through a sewer. Subsequently, he was deployed in Burma, where he orchestrated ambushes against the Japanese army, earning himself the nickname, “Lawrence of Burma.”

“Dad’s response to pretty much everything was usually different to everyone else’s response. Rules were there, not just to be broken, but to pit yourself against, to outwit. It was an intellectual exercise for him.”

Keggie Carew interweaves flashbacks of her life with her father with his immensely dangerous guerrilla warfare work with the SOE. One moment, in the book, he is parachuted into France under cover of night, unsure if his reception is the Gestapo ready to execute him. The next moment, we are told of a time when Tom urinated in a bar sink having been unable to find a toilet.

The meticulousness of the author in her observations of Tom Carew the father, husband and secret agent bring both the character and the history to life. The reader gets a sense of his humour, insouciance, brilliance, flaws and the effects of his struggles with dementia. That same care for detail by the author makes the history told of the SOE operations vivid and insightful. The book is a wonderful tribute, drama and history rolled into one.

Further information

Author Book Signing – Keggie Carew will be signing copies of her book, Dadland, at the Imperial War Museum London on Saturday 12th November 2016.

Guardian review of Dadland by Keggie Carew:  https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jul/30/dadland-keggie-carew-review-remarkable-life

Video interview with Keggie Carew:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcUEnpVf6ak

Interview with Keggie Carew – Gloss Magazine
http://thegloss.ie/2016/07/writers-block-keggie-carew/

 

Short film Review: Balcony – Winner of Iris Prize 2016

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Genevieve Dunne (left) and Charlotte Beaumont (right) star in Balcony (Toby Fell-Holden/Film Doo)

Balcony, the Iris Prize Winner of the Cardiff-based international LGBTQ short film festival, is a confounding 17-minute drama set in an estate of high rise flats and features two girls in a hostile environment. Tina is a lonely teenager who finds herself drawn to Dana, from Afghanistan, who lives with her father and does not mix with the rest of the kids.

“The problem about being surrounded by bad things is you get the urge to destroy anything good,” Tina shares with the viewer after we see her take a photo with Dana.

The film is seen through Tina’s eyes and imagination. The viewer’s assumptions about Dana, who wears a headscarf and Tina, the tough teenager, are questioned. “People seem like they care but really, there’s way more to it than that,” Tina says, as we learn more about her abusive home life.

Toby Holden-Fell’s film questions stereotypes about immigrants and the choice of Dana as an Afghani opens up wider issues of Britain’s relationship with Afghanistan. “You’d think people’d want the truth when, really, they just want to hear whatever’ll make them feel better,” Tina says at the dramatic end.

Iris Prize jury chair Cheryl Dunye commented, “We felt that the director crafted a powerful film where not a single moment of its 17 minutes was wasted. The lead performance by Charlotte Beaumont was particularly outstanding as she took us on an internal transformation that left us speechless.”

Other winners on the night included Real Boy, a documentary by Shaleece Haas, which picked up the Best Feature Award, and Sign, selected by members of Pride Cymru’s Youth Council for the Iris Youth Prize Award.

Further information

Balcony is currently available to view with a TV licence on BBC IPlayer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b082rtyw/iris-prize-winning-film-2016-balcony

Montage of the films that competed for the £30,000 10th Iris Prize, 2016 – https://www.youtube.com/user/johnberwyn

Film Doo interview with director, Toby Fell-Holden:
https://www.filmdoo.com/blog/2016/06/28/interview-toby-fell-holden-on-balcony/