John Singer Sargent’s ‘Gassed’: more allusion than fact?

pafa-gassed

‘Gassed’ by John Singer Sargent being installed at Pennsylvania Acadamy of Fine Art (PAFA)

John Singer Sargent’s Gassed is on loan to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA) from the Imperial War Museums for PAFA’s exhibition, World War 1 and American Art, running from November 2016 to April 2017. The exhibition coincides with the centenary anniversary of US involvement in WW1.

The Eclectic Light Company

Some remember John Singer Sargent for his portraits of the most affluent in society. For many, though, his most memorable painting is his vast canvas showing the horrors of the First World War, in the Imperial War Museum, London: Gassed (1919). As with the work of all war artists, we tend to assume that this shows a real scene from the front, a hideous truth about that war. This article looks at the probable limits of that truth, and how much might be allusion.

Sargent, as an American who had worked much of his career in London, was commissioned by the War Memorials Committee of the Ministry of Information in Britain to paint a large work showing Anglo-American co-operation in the war. This was originally destined for a Hall of Remembrance, which was never built, but which required a very large if not monumental painting. He set off for theā€¦

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